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GCSE Vocabulary

GCSE Vocabulary

  • Vocabulary
  • comprehensive - including or dealing with all or nearly all elements or aspects of something
    • You can only do well in exams if your answers are accurate and comprehensive including lots of important detail.
    • The manager did a comprehensive survey of his customers asking many questions of everyone who entered the store over two weeks.
    • The documentary on teenager homelessness was comprehensive exploring all the reasons for it happening.
    • To prevent the thieves from being able to sell the stolen painting, the police put together a comprehensive plan of action visiting all the possible buyers and sellers of fine art.
  • complacent - not bothering to try because of your past achievements
    • You talented swimmer started losing races after he became complacent and reduced his training.
    • She developed a complacent attitude towards her exams after repeatedly getting the best results in class, and failed.
    • He continued to win because he never allowed himself to be complacent no matter how many times he came first.
    • Charlie remained maintained a high standard at work because he kept studying after qualifying not allowing the positive feedback from his boss to make him complacent.
  • dexterity - skilled with tasks especially hands
    • It requires dexterity to be a good carpenter because many wooden items involve detailed work that must be done precisely.
    • He answered the angry parents questions with the dexterity of a skilled politician.
    • When the 6 year old prodigy sat down at the piano, he proved himself to be as dextrous as a highly trained adult pianist.
    • The lawyer won numerous cases in court due to his dexterity in examining witnesses, getting them to say exactly what he wanted to say.
  • implausible - (of an argument or statement) not seeming reasonable or probable; failing to convince
    • George made a series of implausible excuses to get out of his doing his work.
    • The evidence is so overwhelming that the claim that the world is flat, is both ridiculous and implausible.
    • I found the plot of the book implausible with people being able to read minds and come back from the dead.
    • It is implausible to suggest that the huge numbers of experienced biologists and academics have misinterpreted the evidence as showing the evolution of life on the planet.
  • apathy - a great lack of interest, or enthusiasm
    • The teacher was disapointed by the apathy of his students towards science which lead to poor exam results.
    • The apathy of voters on important issues such as human rights and democracy have allowed the government to pass laws that give them unprecidented power.
    • Widespread apathy among the club members resulted in most meetings being cancelled because not enough people promised to attend.
    • Student apathy is a problem at university resulting in few students learning more than they need to obtain a degree.
  • pedantic - over concerned with minor details
    • Some people think that I am being pedantic when I insist that apostrophes are used correctly when writing.
    • The lecturer was so pedantic about the origin of every single word in the essay that he made the subject tedious and boring.
    • The teacher was interested in his students producing entertaining, creative stories so was not pedantic about punctuation and spelling.
    • It is pedantic for siblings to argue about who is the better child.
  • semantics - the study of the meanings of words and phrases in language
    • Because Tomas' native tongue is not English, he is often confused by the semantics of colloquialisms used by English teenagers.
    • Many BBC programs have to be remade for US TV because Americans are regularly confused by the semantics of the English language.
    • The talented author played with semantics to create a frightening scene in his new book, a scene that would grip his readers and make them want to read more.
    • A good knowledge of Latin can asssist students with the semantics of the English language.
  • gregarious - fond of company; highly sociable
    • Zebras are gregarious animals often living in herds of hundreds of animals.
    • Manav would be gregarious if he could anyone that would tolerate having him around.
    • The gregarious girl spent so much time socialising that she failed to do any work and did not pass a single exam.
    • Because killer whales are gregarious creatures living in pods up to several hundred strong, they will die of loneliness when kept on their own in captivity.
  • strife - a continued state of angry or bitter disagreement over issues
    • The strife between gangs in Harlem has been the direct cause of numerous injuries and deaths of young men.
    • After years of strife, the couple decided to separate and take time to think if they still wanted to be together.
    • He agreed to spend more time with her friends to avoid more strife than was necessary between them.
    • Even though Manav was hurt by Jai cheating on him, he decided to say remain silent rather than causing strife between them.
  • provocative - causing anger or another strong reaction, especially deliberately
    • The way that she questions everything that the politicians say directly and publically, is what makes her journalism so provocative.
    • The barrister made provocative statements in order to make the witness angry in front of the jury.
    • The teacher chose to ignore the student's provocative statements because he did not want to end up in conflict with the class so early in the day.
    • His speech was deliberately provocative hoping that his listeners would start a riot and turn on his opponents.
  • Vocabulary
  • epiphany - a sudden moment of great revelation
    • He lived his life going to work day after day, when he had an epiphany, realising that life was too short to waste. He gave up his job and set out to travel the world.
    • After years of religious devotion, an epiphany led him to see through his beliefs and open his mind to thinking for himself about the difficult questions that life presents.
    • When I nearly died in a car accident, I experienced a huge ephiphany and began to walk everywhere.
    • Jake made it his mission to share his epiphany on making money with as many people that would listen.
  • besotted - strongly infatuated, completely in love with someone and always thinking of them
    • The besotted husband waited on his wife hand and foot buying her presents, bringing her flowers, and never letting her do anything for herself.
    • Manav is besotted with George and hopes they will be happily married forever living in their own home with lots of children.
    • The besotted parent gave her nasty, spoilt child everything she wanted no matter how much it cost or how bad it was for her.
    • Arjun is besotted with Manav so angry that he is in love with George and George is in love with Manav. Arjun feels hurt and left out.
  • misnomer - a wrong or inaccurate name or use of a name
    • A guinea pig does not come from Guinea and is not a pig so its name is a misnomer.
    • Peanuts are not nuts, but they are related to peas and beans. Their name is a simple misnomer.
    • The scientific term, a light-year, is a misnomer. Despite how it sounds, it is not an amount of time but rather a vast distance. It is, in fact, the distance traveled by light in a single year.
    • Koala bears are not bears, and king crabs aren't crabs. The horned toad and the slow worm are actually lizards. Starfish and jellyfish aren't fish, and velvet ants are actually wasps. These are just of the animals whose names are misnomers.
  • intrepid - fearless and adventurous, extremely brave and showing no fear of dangerous situations
    • The intrepid traveler was not put off from sailing up the Amazon by stories of blood-thristy, head-hunting tribes, giant Anacondas 3m long that could crush a man with ease, and shoals of hungry, flesh eating piranhas in the river.
    • Photographers in war zones need to be intrepid not knowing when they might be killed by a stray bullet or a deliberate bomb.
    • The intrepid firemen who rushed into the burning building home to orphans without thought for their own safety, deserved the medals they received.
    • After seeing the 6 year old pick up the spider with his own hands to carry it outdoors, her mother described her as intrepid and kind when telling her friends about the event.
  • invaluable - extremely useful; indispensable
    • The work of Heroditus is invaluable for the understanding Persian history.
    • A dictionary is invaluable for anyone wanting to improve their vocabulary.
    • The internet is an invaluable source of information for students writing essays on Macbeth.
    • John proved to be an invaluable source of new ideas in the team trying to solve the crime.
  • transient - lasting for a short time
    • Snow in England is transient lasting only until the sun comes out for a few hours.
    • The transient lasted only 20 minutes but was so violent that it took weeks to clean up the mess and damage it left behind.
    • Even though the lunar eclipse is a transient event, it is it generates great enthusiasm among millions of people around the world.
    • The doctor told the patient that his fever and headache were transient and that he would be fine by the end of the day.
  • canard - an unfounded rumour or story
    • Newspapers will often print something that they know to be a canard because the profits from increased sales are more than the costs of being sued.
    • Dru was so upset when he was rejected by Manav that he spread the canard that Manav like to wear female underwear.
    • The saying that 'an apple a day keeps the doctor away' is actually a canard as it is possible to eat apples regularly and still get sick.
    • The notion of trickle-down-economics is a canard promoted by the rich to avoid paying their fair share of tax.
  • avuncular - kind and friendly towards a younger person
    • My best friend's father treats me in an avuncular manner having known me since I was born.
    • The man's avuncular personality made him very popular with the children in the village and led to them calling him Uncle Pete.
    • The man thought that he was speaking with an avuncular tone but the girl found it overly familiar.
    • The teacher's avuncular manner made it difficult for him to control the badly behaved class.
  • indefatigable - (of a person or their efforts) persisting tirelessly
    • indefatigable
    • indefatigable
    • indefatigable
    • indefatigable
  • miscreant - a person who has done something wrong or unlawful
    • miscreant
    • miscreant
    • miscreant
    • miscreant
  • Vocabulary
  • sympathy - feelings of sorrow for someone else's misfortune
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  • demagogue - a political leader who seeks support by appealing to popular desires and prejudices rather than by using rational argument
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  • empathy - the ability to understand and share the feelings of another
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  • xenophobia - dislike of or prejudice against people of other countries or groups
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  • concur -
    • After listening to the facts, I concur that your proposal is the best route to follow.
    • He did not concur with his teacher on how many times he had been absent from class.
    • At the end of WWW I, the German people did not concur with the terms of the Treaty of Versailles.
    • Jack and Jill concurred that going up the hill was the best course of action.
  • circumspect - wary and unwilling to take risks; cautious
    • It is wise to be circumspect about buying shares as it is both possible to lose as well as make a lot of money.
    • He acted in a circumspect manner, carefully checking each of the promises made by the businessman.
    • Sir Wooldrige's circumspect approach in political matters, made him a superb diplomat.
    • A good scientist is circumspect about making claims, collecting large amount of objective data first.
  • insinuate - suggest or hint (something bad) in an indirect and unpleasant way
    • During questioning at the police station, the police insinuated that John had stolen the money and was lying to them.
    • Sami could tell from the teacher's comments that he was insinuating that he had copied his friend's homework when he was supposed to have done it himself.
    • It is better to ask direct questions if you suspect a person of dishonesty than to insinuate that the person is lying.
    • When Donald Trump disagreed, he insinuated that Trump was too stupid to understand the science behind his proposal.
  • rendezvous- meeting at an agreed time & place
    • The football team decided to rendezvous at their captain's home before the match to discuss strategy.
    • Arshpreet and Manav rendezvous at a quiet cafe for lunch because they don't want anyone to know that they are dating.
    • The Bentall Centre is a popular rendezvous point for teenagers on weekends.
    • During the war, spies would often exchange information during a rendezvous in a carefully chosen location where they were unlikely to be noticed.
  • disparage - criticize in a way that shows you consider them of little or no worth
    • Political leaders tend to disparage their opponents rather than focusing on the merits of their own policies.
    • The suffragettes were cruelly disparaged by the male-dominated establishment during their fight for the vote for women.
    • Donald Trump spends a lot of time disparaging his critics rather than responding with rational arguments.
    • The teacher chose to disparage the student rather than providing constructive feedback.
  • cynical - believing that people are motivated purely by self-interest
    • Most people took a cynical view believing that Oscar only donated the money to draw attention to himself.
    • I am not being cynical when I say that the only reason Arshpreet is ever nice to anyone, is when he wants something.
    • Some people said that Alisha's story about her sick grandmother, was a cynical ploy to avoid getting into trouble for yet again failing to do her homework.
    • Posh pretends to be nice but she is actually a nasty, cynical cow who thinks the worst of everyone she meets.
  • Vocabulary
  • ambivalent - having mixed feelings about something or someone
  • bald - wholly or partly lacking hair
  • bold - confident, courageous, and willing to take risks
  • diligent - hard working, taking great care and being thorough in one's work or duties
  • impertinent - rude and cheeky;
  • inevitable - certain to happen; unavoidable
  • eligible - meets the appropriate conditions
  • jubilant - feeling great happiness and triumph
  • notorious - famous for something bad
  • vet - make a careful and critical examination of
  • Vocabulary
  • subjective - based on opinion or emotion
  • consistent - 1. (of people or activities) done in the same way over time
  • consistent - 2. (of argument or ideas) not containing any logical contradictions
  • anecdote - a short account of an incident or event, often interesting or amusing
  • facetious - treating serious issues with deliberately inappropriate humour
  • objective - not based on opinion or emotion
  • flippant - not showing a serious or respectful attitude
  • juxtapose - put close together to contrast or compare
  • remote - far away from the main centres of population
  • bigotry - holding strong, unreasonable prejudices or opinions
  • Vocabulary
  • infer - to reason or deduce from evidence
  • surmise - to suppose with little to no evidence "he surmised that something must be wrong"
  • expedient - convenient or necessary but breaks a rule
  • trivial - of little value or importance
  • tedious - painfully long or boring
  • arbitrary - for no good reason
  • enigma - a mystery
  • procrastinate - to keep delaying
  • serendipity - chance or mistake that works out well
  • profound - deep or intense
  • Vocabulary
  • amiable - having or displaying a friendly and pleasant manner
  • cumulative - increasing or increased in quantity
  • abhor - regard with great disgust and deep hatred
  • fabricate - invent (something) in order to deceive
  • furtive - attempting to avoid notice or attention, typically because of guilt or a belief that discovery would lead to trouble; secretive; suggestive of guilty nervousness
  • inhibit - hinder, restrain, or prevent (an action or process)
  • morose - sullen and ill-tempered
  • colloquial - (of language) used in ordinary or familiar conversation; not formal or literary
  • insatiable - (of an appetite or desire) impossible to satisfy
  • paraphrase - a rewording of something written or spoken
  • Vocabulary
  • despot - a ruler or other person who holds absolute power, typically one who exercises it in a cruel or oppressive way
  • elated - extremely, extremely happy
  • eloquent - fluent and persuasive in speaking or writing
  • haughty - arrogantly superior and disdainful
  • implicit - suggested though not directly expressed
  • meticulous - showing great attention to detail; very careful and precise
  • novice - a person new to and inexperienced in a job or situation
  • nuance - a subtle difference in or shade of meaning, expression, or sound
  • quaint - attractively unusual or old-fashioned
  • rash - acting or done without careful consideration of the possible consequences
  • Vocabulary
  • contrast - the state of being strikingly different from something else in juxtaposition or close association
  • assert - state a fact or belief confidently and forcefully
  • recite - repeat aloud or declaim (a poem or passage) from memory before an audience
  • distinguish - recognize or treat (someone or something) as different.
  • analogy - comparison between one thing and another, typically for the purpose of explanation or clarification
  • evaluate - form an idea of the amount, number, or value of; assess
  • irony - the expression of one's meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect
  • personification - the attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to something non-human, or the representation of an abstract quality in human form
  • onomatopoeia - the formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named
  • oxymoron - a figure of speech in which apparently contradictory terms appear in conjunction
  • Vocabulary
  • repugnant - extremely distasteful; unacceptable
  • alacrity - brisk and cheerful readiness
  • arcane - requiring secret or mysterious knowledge
  • truculent - defiantly aggressive
  • brazen - unrestrained by convention or propriety
  • brusque - marked by rude or peremptory shortness
  • cajole - influence or urge by gentle urging, caressing, or flattering
  • clandestine - conducted with or marked by hidden aims or methods
  • coerce - to cause to do through pressure or necessity
  • coherent - marked by an orderly and consistent relation of parts
  • Vocabulary
  • confidant - someone to whom private matters are told
  • connive - form intrigues (for) in an underhand manner
  • debase - make impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance
  • decry - express strong disapproval of
  • demure - affectedly shy especially in a playful or provocative way
  • deride - treat or speak of with contempt
  • embezzle - appropriate fraudulently to one's own use
  • enmity - a state of deep-seated ill-will
  • feral - wild and menacing
  • forsake - leave someone who needs or counts on you; leave in the lurch
  • Vocabulary
  • fractious - easily irritated or annoyed
  • gluttony - habitual eating to excess
  • hypocrisy - pretending to have qualities or beliefs that you do not have
  • impudent - improperly forward or bold
  • incisive - demonstrating ability to recognize or draw fine distinctions
  • indolent - disinclined to work or exertion
  • inept - generally incompetent and ineffectual
  • infamy - a state of extreme dishonor
  • insular - relating to or characteristic of or situated on an island
  • umbrage - a feeling of anger caused by being offended
  • Vocabulary
  • habitual - done constantly or as a habit
  • lithe - moving and bending with ease
  • lurid - glaringly vivid and graphic; marked by sensationalism
  • maverick - someone who exhibits independence in thought and action
  • maxim - a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits
  • modicum - a small or moderate or token amount
  • myriad - a large indefinite number
  • nadir - the lowest point of anything
  • inept - having or showing no skill; clumsy
  • panacea - hypothetical remedy for all ills or diseases
  • Vocabulary
  • parody - a composition that imitates or misrepresents a style
  • penchant - a strong liking
  • perusal - reading carefully with intent to remember
  • plethora - extreme excess
  • refurbish - make brighter and prettier
  • repudiate - refuse to acknowledge, ratify, or recognize as valid
  • rife - excessively abundant
  • salient - conspicuous, prominent, or important
  • staid - characterized by dignity and propriety
  • impudent - not showing due respect for another person; impertinent
  • Vocabulary
  • superfluous - more than is needed, desired, or required
  • taciturn - habitually reserved and uncommunicative
  • venerable - profoundly honored
  • vociferous - conspicuously and offensively loud
  • alliteration - use of the same consonant at the beginning of each word
  • assonance - the repetition of similar vowels in successive words
  • cliche - a trite or obvious remark
  • imperative - requiring attention or action
  • narcissistic - having an inflated idea of one's own importance
  • persona - a personal facade that one presents to the world

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