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KS Learning
A Level Vocabulary

A Level Vocabulary

  • Vocabulary
  • propriety - the rules of behaviour conventionally considered to be correct
    • They broke the chain of authority, without, however, recognizing the propriety of toleration.
    • Afterwards all four states, with several others, accepted the invitation of Austria to consider the propriety of re-establishing the Confederation.
    • They refuted him easily on many specific points, but carefully abstained from discussing the real question, at issue, namely the propriety of free inquiry.
    • Within a month it was transformed, and presented, says an eyewitness, "a scene where stillness and propriety reigned.
  • acquiesce - accept something reluctantly but without protest
    • Linda acquiesced to Fred's plaintive pleas to hold their wedding in his Village farm house.
    • The group acquiesced to the new regulations even though they were opposed to them.
    • The millionaire refused to acquiesce to the demand of his former driver, blackmailing him with photos of his extramarital affairs.
    • The president said that he will never acquiesce to the demands of the terrorists.
  • chide - scold or rebuke
    • Ibraheem didn't want Ken to chide him for being late again, so he set his alarm for a half hour earlier.
    • Harry knew that his teacher would probably chide him for his bad handwriting, so he decided to type the final draft of her essay.
    • If Nikhil didn't chide Damanjeet about wearing his spinning turban, he would probably sometimes forget.
    • Although Jai realized that the uncles would chide him for being impatient, he decided to remind them that they owed him money.
  • deferential - treat with respect
    • Nurses deserve to be treated in a deferential manner for their commitment to the NHS despite the awful way they are being treated by the government.
    • If you treat others with deference, people will usually respect you back.
    • Ken is so kind, understanding, and nice to his students, that they should be deferential at all times towards him.
    • The deferential young man impressed the unhappy customer so much that he calmed down and left the shop happy.
  • extol - praise enthusiastically; students extol Ken's genius
  • impeccable - in accordance with the highest standards; faultless
  • nominal - (of a price or charge) far below the real value or cost
  • nominal - (of a role or status) existing in name only
  • predilection - a preference or bias in favour of something
  • zenith - the time at which something is most powerful or successful
  • Vocabulary
  • sycophant - a person who acts obsequiously towards someone to gain advantage
    • Because she always kisses up to the teacher, Simran is considered the sycophant in first period.
    • Ridhi is a shallow sycophant who will flatter anyone for a free designer handbag.
    • Because Rohan really wanted a good grade in his Chemistry, the sycophant gave his teacher an expensive Christmas present.
    • Sami felt the only way he could get a promotion at work was to act like a sycophant and appear to be the supervisor's biggest fan.
  • prolix - (speech, writing) using too many words
    • Mohit's explanations were apt to be prolix, stretching his listeners patience to the limit.
    • To those who have no patience with the minutiae of legislation, the prolix discussions are as irksome as the arguments appear arbitrary.
    • The style of Amna's essay is wearisome and prolix, explaining the smallest point in several paragraphs when it only needed a sentence of two.
    • Nikhil's prolix answers did not get him any extra marks but meant that his used nearly twice as much paper as all other students.
  • laconic - (speech, writing) using very few words
    • I don't have all day, so be laconic with your answers.
    • The audience were tired so very grateful that the last speaker of the day delivered an inspiring and laconic speech.
    • If lawyers were were laconic, trials in court would be a lot shorter saving considerable time.
    • To save valuable time, the police gave the medics a laconic explanation of the accident.
  • wanton - (of violence) deliberate & unprovoked
    • Saffiyah's wanton disregard for others was obvious when she drove home extremely drunk.
    • Mohit has been accused of wanton cruelty toward his neighbour's dog after he kicked and threw stones at it.
    • The judge sentenced Jay to two hundred hours of community service for his wanton acts of vandalism.
    • The man is probably going to go to prison for life for his wanton killing of six schoolchildren.
  • ineluctable - unable to be resisted or avoided
  • incipient - beginning to happen or develop
  • bereft - deprived of or lacking (something)
  • bereft - (of a person) sad and lonely, especially through someone's death or departure
  • trope - any type of figure of speech, theme, image, character, or plot element that is used many times. Any kind of literary device or any specific example can be a trope. Most often the word is used to refer to tropes that are widespread such as irony, metaphor, juxtaposition, and hyperbole, or themes such as ‘the noble savage’ or ‘the reluctant hero.’ It must be used multiple times to be a ‘trope’ but it is also possible talk about something that's a trope in only one novel or one author's works if it is used many times.
  • dogmatic - inclined to lay down principles as undeniably true
  • Vocabulary
  • inveterate - having a particular habit, activity, or interest that is established & unlikely to change
  • disconcerted - unsettle or throw into confusion by something unexpected
  • discombobulated - bewildered & disorientated
  • augur - to be a sign of especially good or bad things in the future
  • duplicitous - deceitful as in double-dealing
  • misogyny - dislike of, contempt for, or ingrained prejudice against women
  • avarice- extreme greed for wealth or material gain
  • erudite - having or showing great knowledge or learning
  • congenital - having a particular trait from birth
  • incorrigible - (of a person or their behaviour) not able to be changed or reformed
  • Vocabulary
  • gratuitous-not called for or just for the sake of it
  • churlish - rude in a mean-spirited and surly way
  • innate - (of an ability) born with it, not learned
  • villify - speak or write about in an abusively disparaging manner
  • perfunctory - (of an action) carried out without real interest, feeling, or effort; in an uncaring, hasty and superficial way
  • prevaricate - speak or act in an evasive way
  • obsequious - attentive to an excessive degree
  • eponymous - named after a particular person or group
  • hypothetical - existing as an idea or concept, based on possible ideas rather than actual ones
  • gist - the general meaning of text or speech
  • Vocabulary
  • disingenuous - not candid or sincere, typically pretending one knows less than one really does
  • equivocation - the use of ambiguous language to conceal the truth
  • innocuous - not harmful or offensive
  • pejorative - expressing contempt or disapproval
  • hedonism - the pursuit of great pleasure especially physical
  • prescient - having or showing knowledge of events before they take place
  • vicarious - experienced through the feelings or actions of another person
  • placate - make (someone) less angry or hostile
  • appease - pacify by giving in to demands
  • pyrrhic - (of a victory) won at too great a cost to have been worthwhile for the victor
  • Vocabulary
  • implacable - unable to be appeased or placated
  • kibosh - put an end to usually decisively
  • affinity - a strong connection between people or things
  • sciolism - expressing opinions on something of which one has little real understanding i.e. Donald Trump
  • hiatus - a pause or break
  • sanguine - positive especially in difficult times
  • prosaic - ordinary to the point of being dull and boring;unimaginative
  • visceral - of deep inner feelings rather not intellect
  • ubiquitous - present or turning up everywhere
  • hyperbole - exaggerated often to make a point
  • Vocabulary
  • solipsism - the view or theory that the self is all that can be known to exist; self-centered, selfish
  • parochial - having a limited or narrow outlook or scope; local
  • persuant - in accordance with
  • aberration - a departure from what is normal, usual, or expected, typically an unwelcome one
  • arcane - understood by few; obscure even mysterious knowledge
  • brusque - abrupt or offhand in speech or manner
  • homage - special honour or respect shown publicly
  • debase - reduce (something) in quality or value; degrade or bring down
  • demure - (of a woman or her behaviour) reserved, modest, and shy
  • indolent - wanting to avoid activity or exertion; slow, lazy and apathetic;
  • Vocabulary
  • rigmarole - a lengthy and complicated procedure
  • venal - willing to behave in a way that is not honest or moral in exchange for money
  • idyllic - extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque
  • privation - a state in which food and other essentials for well-being are lacking
  • venerable - accorded a great deal of respect, especially because of age, wisdom, or character
  • umbrage - (to take) offence or annoyance
  • superfluous - more than is needed or wanted; more than enough
  • salient - the salient facts about something or qualities of something are the most important and relevant things about them
  • plethora - a large or excessive amount of something
  • insalubrious - (of a place) seedy and run-down; unwholesome
  • Vocabulary
  • paradigm - an example that serves as a pattern or model
  • censure - express severe disapproval of (someone or something), especially in a formal statement
  • impecunious - having little or no money
  • obtuse - difficult to understand, especially deliberately so
  • vicissitude - a change of circumstances or fortune, typically one that is unwelcome or unpleasant
  • repudiate - to reject, refuse to accept
  • alacrity - brisk and cheerful readiness
  • brazen - bold and without shame
  • vociferous - expressing or characterized by vehement opinions; loud and forceful
  • myriad - a countless or extremely great number of people or things
  • Vocabulary
  • reprehensible - deserving censure or condemnation
  • candour - the quality of being open and honest; frankness
  • callous - showing or having an insensitive and cruel disregard for others
  • flabbergasted - surprise (someone) greatly; astonish
  • perusal - the action of reading or examining something
  • panacea - a solution or remedy for all difficulties or diseases
  • enmity - a state or feeling of active opposition or hostility
  • oblivious - not aware of or concerned about what is happening around one
  • loquacious - tending to talk a great deal; talkative
  • despondent - in low spirits from loss of hope or courage
  • Vocabulary
  • disparate - essentially different in kind; not able to be compared
  • abate - to decrease; reduce; (of something unpleasant or severe) become less intense or widespread
  • amalgamate - to combine into a unified whole
  • apprise - inform or tell (someone)
  • austere - unadorned; severe or strict in manner or attitude
  • burnish - to polish; enhance or improve
  • commensurate - corresponding in size or degree; in proportion
  • dupe - to deceive; trick
  • contrite - feeling or expressing sincere sorrow at the recognition that one has done wrong
  • denigrate - to slur someone's reputation; criticize unfairly; disparage
  • Vocabulary
  • pristine - untouched; uncorrupted
  • pungent - strong, sharp in smell or taste; penetrating; caustic to the point
  • quibble - to argue or insignificant and irrelevant details
  • repudiate - to reject as having no authority
  • sage - wise
  • soporific - sleep producing
  • verbose - wordy
  • plummet - to fall; plunge
  • precipitate - to cause to happen; throw down from a height
  • coherent - (of an argument, theory, or policy) logical and consistent.
  • Vocabulary
  • abeyance - temporary suppression or suspension
  • antipathy - dislike; hostility
  • trite -
  • bombastic - pompous; using inflated language
  • caustic - burning; sarcastically biting
  • contentious - quarrelsome; causing quarrels
  • disseminate - spread; scatter; disperse
  • euphemism - use of agreeable or inoffensive language in place of unpleasant or offensive language
  • harangue - long pompous speech; tirade
  • impede - hinder; block
  • Vocabulary
  • aesthetic - relating to beauty or art
  • arduous - extremely difficult; laborious
  • banal - commonplace; trite
  • fickle -
  • chicanery - trickery ; fraud
  • diatribe - bitter verbal attack
  • eclectic - selecting from various sources
  • garrulous - very talkative; wordy
  • impervious - impossible to penetrate; incapable of being effected
  • inundate - to cover with water; overwhelm
  • Vocabulary
  • audacious - daring; bold
  • pompous -
  • capricious - fickle
  • confound - to baffle; perplex; mix up
  • discerning - perceptive; Exhibiting keen insight and good judgment
  • emulate - imitate; copy
  • homogeneous - composed of identical parts; uniform in compositions
  • implicit - implied; understood but not stated
  • irascible - irritable; easily angered
  • digression - act of straying away from the main point

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